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Writing Type-Safe Collections in C#

by Amit Goel
03/10/2003

Introduction

Compiled programming languages allow earlier error checking, better enforcement of programming styles, and generation of more efficient object code than interpreted languages, where all type-consistency checks are performed at run time. However, even in compiled languages, there is often the need to deal with data whose type cannot be determined at compile time. In such cases, a certain amount of dynamic type checking is required in order to preserve type-safety.

For example, the Collections Framework in C# allows the creation of a collection of System.Object types, which then requires an unsafe downcast to the class of the desired type. Since an object of any type can be wrapped into a System.Object--the ultimate superclass of all classes, in the .NET Framework--we can essentially create containers of objects in which we can put anything at all. A user of this container is then faced with the problem of guessing the type of each object. Hence it is the responsibility of the programmer to make sure that the collection gets populated with objects of the correct type, and that necessary checks are performed while retrieving objects from the collection. As new developers get added to a team, or as new developers take on a project, it becomes quite difficult to enforce such discipline, and the potential for error increases greatly.

Fortunately, instead of relying on verbal communications or written guidelines to enforce this discipline, developers can apply object-oriented techniques to achieve compile-time type safety with collections. In this article, I will describe the various ways in which type-safe collections can be written in C#, and the advantages and disadvantages of each approach.

First Approach: Inheriting from Existing Collection Classes

One obvious approach that comes to mind is to derive from an existing collection class and override all methods that need to enforce type checking. This allows us to reuse most of the methods in the base class for free, and override only a few. It also gives us the flexibility of passing around the derived class wherever the base class type is expected. For example, the following would create a type-safe ArrayList for storing a list of Customer objects:


// CustomerArrayList.cs
public class CustomerArrayList : System.Collections.ArrayList
{
  public new Customer this[int index]
  {
    get { return ((Customer)base[index]); }
  }

  public int Add(Customer customer)
  {
    return base.Add(customer);
  }

  public void Insert(int index, Customer customer)
  {
    base.Insert(index, customer);
  }

  public void Remove(Customer customer)
  {
    base.Remove(customer);
  }

  public bool Contains(Customer customer)
  {
    return base.Contains(customer);
  }

  // Add other type-safe methods here
  // ...
  // ...
}

While this approach helps us achieve what we want, it has a major drawback--i.e., we need to override every method of ArrayList that can compromise its type safety, including overloaded methods. Since all of the public and protected methods of ArrayList are available to CustomerArrayList, not overriding even one type-unsafe method will expose the base ArrayList's method to the programmer--a condition we are trying to avoid. Besides, with every new release of the C# language, we need to check if any new method was added to this class that could break the type-safety of CustomerArrayList, and then override that method. This problem will exist not only for ArrayList, but also for every collection class in the Collections Framework that needs to be made strongly typed. This can be quite a tedious programming task. Surely there's a better way to achieve our goal.

Second Approach: Inheriting from CollectionBase and DictionaryBase

The System.Collections.Specialized namespace in the .NET Framework Class Library contains a few specialized, strongly-typed collections that can contain only strings. For example, StringCollection represents a collection of strings, NameValueCollection contains a sorted list of string keys and string values, and StringDictionary implements a hashtable with string keys and string values. The System.Collections namespace provides a few more specialized, strongly-typed collections like AttributeCollection, CookieCollection, ListItemCollection, etc.

System.Collections.CollectionBase

To create type-safe collections other than the ones supported, the .NET Framework provides a class called CollectionBase in the System.Collections namespace. This is an abstract class that needs to be subclassed in order to be useful. It provides basic functionality like providing a count of the number of elements, removing an element from a particular location, etc.--functionality that does not compromise the type safety of the collection. All other methods (like Add, Remove, Insert, etc.) need to be implemented by the subclasses of CollectionBase.

The .NET Framework provides a few type-safe implementations of CollectionBase. These implementations are for specialized object types. Most often we require collections of custom object types, in which case we need to construct our own collection. Below, we create a type-safe collection of Customer objects by deriving from CollectionBase.


// CustomerList.cs
public class CustomerList : System.Collections.CollectionBase
{
  public Customer this[int index]
  {
    get { return ((Customer)(List[index])); }
    set { List[index] = value; }
  }

  public int Add(Customer customer)
  {
    return List.Add(customer);
  }

  public void Insert(int index, Customer customer)
  {
    List.Insert(index, customer);
  }

  public void Remove(Customer customer)
  {
    List.Remove(customer);
  }

  public bool Contains(Customer customer)
  {
    return List.Contains(customer);
  }

  // Add other type-safe methods here
  // ...
  // ...
}

CollectionBase encapsulates an ArrayList and provides access to it via a protected property called InnerList. CollectionBase also contains a protected property called List, which is nothing but CollectionBase itself, returned as an IList (notice that CollectionBase implements IList). In the code provided above, all calls to CustomerList are delegated to the List object--they could be delegated to the InnerList object as well. So the following code would also be perfectly valid:


// CustomerList.cs
public int Add(Customer customer)
{
  return InnerList.Add(customer);
}

The difference is that List.Add is a wrapper around InnerList.Add. Before List.Add calls InnerList.Add, it calls OnValidate and OnInsert. After calling InnerList.Add, it calls OnInsertComplete. OnValidate, OnInsert, and OnInsertComplete are virtual methods defined by CollectionBase. They can be overridden to perform some custom validation and processing while accessing the members of InnerList.

At this point, you're probably wondering how delegation to the List object is working at all. You're wondering that, since List is nothing but the CollectionBase object itself returned as an IList, calling List.Add seems like another way of calling CollectionBase.Add. And looking at the member definitions for CollectionBase, you do not see any public or protected member called Add. Then how are we able to call List.Add, and how is this code compiling and running? The answer lies in the fact that CollectionBase defines Add as an explicit interface member implementation of IList, which means Add is, in some sense, a private method that can only be accessed through an instance of IList. For this reason, List returns CollectionBase as an instance of IList.

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